Which DEWALT drill should I buy?

Which DEWALT drill should I buy?

Broadly speaking, your DEWALT drills will fall into three categories, light, medium and heavyweight. DCD stands for DEWALT Cordless Drill, and here’s a selection of the best non-corded products they have to offer.

Model

Voltage

Battery Capacity

Max Torque

Max. Drilling Capacity [Metal]

Purpose

DCD991P2

18V

5ah

95 Nm

15 mm

Heavy Duty

DCD796P1

18V

5ah

70 Nm

13 mm

Medium Weight

DCD716D2

10.8V

2ah

30 Nm

10 mm

Lightweight

DCD996P2

18V

5ah

95 Nm

15 mm

Heavy Duty

DCD795P2

18V

5ah

60 Nm

13 mm

Medium Weight

DCD985M2

18V

4ah

80 Nm

13 mm

Medium Weight

 

Which battery capacity do I need?

A cordless tool rises or falls on its battery. Battery capacity is measured in ampere hours (Ah). There is a misconception that larger Ah batteries are more powerful, but this isn’t the case – the larger the Ah, the longer the runtime on the battery between charges, but this runtime could be affected by the application of the product in use. The best way to choose a battery capacity is to first consider your budget and what job you have in mind for the tool. For jobs that only require the tool for occasional use, a small Ah battery should be adequate, for jobs that require frequent use throughout the week, certainly look for a larger Ah capacity. 

Which drill voltage should I choose?

Voltage is the power that will drive your tool, the higher the voltage, the more powerful your machine will be. Just like when choosing your Ah capacity, you should consider the application of the tool and your budget. Low voltage models, such as the DCD716D2, are ideal for smaller light weight applications such as screwdriving and light drilling using DEWALT’s 10.8v battery system. By far the most popular voltage we stock is the 18v range, not only giving the user the power where they need it, but also the portability too.

What is torque?

Torque refers to the rotary turning force of the device. The higher the torque you have, the larger the fastener or drill bit that can be driven. Most Combi Drills and Drill Drivers will have multiple torque settings that link back to the machine's clutch system. This is adjusted using the numbered collar located behind the chuck and gives the user much more precision when screwdriving by engaging the clutch at the selected torque and then this doesn't drive the screw too far into the material being worked on.

What is an SDS drill?

An SDS hammer drill has a hammer piston which beats the drill bit as it rotates to be more impactful making these drills ideal for working in stone and masonry. SDS stands for self-direct system and the drill bits and chisels with the SDS fitting click and lock directly into the chuck. A majority of SDS drills give the option to turn the hammer drill off so that you can use it for lighter weight jobs too, using an SDS adaptor and a standard keyed or keyless chuck. You can also turn off the rotation function and use a chisel bit to chip away at brick or concrete walls. This is helpful if you need to hide wires or cables in the wall or even when you need to remove plaster from brickwork. DEWALT signifies the hammer drill with the prefix DCH – DEWALT Cordless Hammer. The letters at the end signify whether the drill will be body only (N), or that it comes within a package, for instance with 2Ah Li-ion batteries (D) 4ah Li-ion batteries (M) and 5Ah Li-ion batteries (P).

What about impact drivers?

An impact driver's main purpose is to drive large fasteners, long screws and lag bolts (with the use of an adapter). An impact driver drill will be signified by the suffix DCF – DEWALT Cordless Fastening. 

 

Posted by ToolStore UK
9th September 2019

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